Daily News & Com­men­tary — June 21, 2017

Yesterday, Travis Kalanick resigned from his post as chief executive at Uber following a series of scandals concerning the company’s workplace culture and legal problems.  Earlier on Tuesday, a group of investors insisted Kalanick step down in a joint letter.  Kalanick will continue to serve on Uber’s board.  Read more here.

The White House announced that President Trump will nominate Marvin Kaplan to the National Labor Relations Board.  Kaplan currently serves as independent counsel at the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.  Previously, he served as counsel on the Republican staff of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.  With two vacancies at the Board and Democrats controlling two of the three filled seats, this announcement puts President Trump on the path to creating a Republican majority at the NLRB.  A Republican controlled Board could rollback many Obama era decisions.  President Trump will also nominate Patrick Pizzella to fill the role of Deputy Secretary at the Department of Labor.  

In international news, the New York Times reported that Laurent Berger, the leader of the French Democratic Confederation of Labor, might be willing to work with the French government to update the country’s labor code.  Berger suggests that President Emmanuel Macron’s victory may provide an opportunity for reform.  Macron has championed “flexible security,” an economic model originating in Denmark.  The system aims to foster agreement between management and labor and reduce unemployment.  While some of Macron’s proposed reforms are likely to face stiff opposition from unions, Berger’s belief that “‘in a globalized world, the economy must be able to adjust” provides hope for the reform effort.  Read more here.    

Yesterday, the New York Times published two stories about unhappy workers.  The Times chronicled the abuses the employees of the New York subway and New Jersey Transit system face doing their jobs.  Because unhappy passengers often take their frustrations out on these employees, they routinely face bad behavior from customers ranging from profanity to physical assault.  Read more here.  The Times also examined what compelled a staff exodus at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art.  The employees are suggesting that poor management and labor law violations caused them to leave while members of the museum’s board dispute these contentions.